SAVE THE DATE: 3D Medical Printing Series

During two weeks from 26 January 2021 till 4 February 2021, Jakajima will organise four online 3D Medical Printing Conferences under the 3D Medical Printing Series name. Each conference will cover one specific 3D Printing Medical Topic:

3D Bioprinting is the utilization of 3D printing and 3D printing–like techniques to combine cells, growth factors, and biomaterials to fabricate biomedical parts that maximally imitate natural tissue characteristics.

3D-Bioprinting holds much promise in advancing medicine as tool to replicate cellular complexity of tissue environment, ex vivo for drug screening and as a means of engineering well-defined functional tissue units for transplantation (scaffolds, which can be used to regenerate joints and ligaments).


3D printing is taking its place for dental, orthodontic, and maxillofacial applications. 3D Dental Printing is part of the overall Digital dentistry which refers to the use of dental technologies or devices that incorporates digital or computer-controlled components to carry out dental procedures rather than using mechanical or electrical tools.

With 3D Printing, dental practices and dental prosthesis laboratories can disrupt their traditional workflow and completely dematerialise their work processes, which leads to increased efficiency, cost savings, faster production speeds and improved quality. Digitization has also allowed for better cataloguing and patient-specific care.


3D MedTech printing market can be categorized as medical implants, surgical guides, surgical instruments and hearing aids. The medical implant segment is expected to grow at the fastest rate among all applications in the coming years.


3D printing is making a name for itself in medicine manufacturing. While it’s hard to foresee the wholesale replacement of current tablet manufacturing processes, 3D printing is expected to find a place in certain niche medications and in personalised tablets.

For so-called orphan drugs, the inherent versatility of 3D printing is particularly appealing. Rather than the current situation of pharmaceutical companies needing to maintain expensive specialist infrastructure to manufacture medicines of which low numbers are sold, it is theoretically possible to print many different types of tablets by simply changing the powder used, or even by just changing the ‘ink cartridges’ in commercially available 3D printers.


The 3D Medical Printing Series is the ONLINE follow up of the 3D Medical Conference, which started in 2014.

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