ReCleft is a reusable training simulator for surgeons

recleft

Cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) is the leading craniofacial anomaly affecting 1 in every 500-700 births. Gaining hands-on experience in cleft surgery can be difficult due to limited access within the infant oral cavity and the delicate tissues of the velum. Even minor errors may lead to complications with serious consequences for the patient. Globally, it is estimated that 250,000 infants are born with cleft lip and/or palate in low resource countries each year and it is estimated that a significant proportion are not repaired.

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Clinicians make 3D printed, patient-specific models with help from GE Healthcare and Formlabs

ge healthcare

Anatomical models that allow the combination of hands-on and visual communication and coordination amongst radiologists, surgeons, trainees, and patients around the world.

Historically, software designed to allow manual preparation of image data into 3D printable files has been labor intensive, requiring hours of work. Using the GE Healthcare Advantage Workstationtm (AW) advanced visualization tools, specifically designed for the medical community, radiologists are able to produce models of normal and pathological anatomy using automation techniques that will speed up the pre-3D printing preparation work by taking advantage of the AW’s diagnostic workflow.

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Dental Multi Material 3D Jetting

multi material

by Kateryna Filippovych, Process lead, Océ, a Canon company

Imagine 3D printed full color artificial teeth for permanent use. Why not? This question we asked ourselves two years ago. And our scientific curiosity resulted in first multi material and -color 3D jetted tooth model.
Driving vision is to bring dentistry on a new level of multi-material and colourful 3D printing.
This presentation will provide some insights on the unique jetting possibilities of biocompatible dental resins in combination with 3D workflow software.

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The possible role of 3D computed tomography models in Thoracic Surgery

Università degli studi di Perugia

by Professor Franscesco Puma, Chief of Thoracic Surgery Department. Full Professor in Thoracic Surgery, Università degli studi di Perugia

We present our experience in the use of the 3D computed tomography – based template in the surgical planning of complex procedures in Thoracic Surgery. We used this approach in two different clinical settings: Tracheal surgery and surgery for extended chest wall tumors.
In the latter, this approach made it possible to obtain an ideal customization of the chest wall prosthesis, precisely adapted to the postoperative defect of the chest wall.
The 3D model of the trachea, larynx and carina, allowed us to ascertain the extent of the presumed airway segment to resect and the possible need for additional surgical release maneuvers.

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From digital to real: 3D printed model as new tool for modern general surgeons

From digital to real

by Professor Luigi Marano, University of Siena

Over the last years, the increase of intraoperative safety for patients and surgeons as well as the concept of “precision surgery” have been advocated as main topics of surgical research, particularly as regards the minimally invasive approaches. The proper patient-specific preoperative planning is mandatory to achieve a meticulous knowledge of the target anatomy, thus helping surgeons to imagine in their minds critical steps and potential complications of surgery. In addition, the more the anatomy is complex due to native anatomic anomalies, disease-related distortions or prior surgical interventions, the harder is the surgical strategy to apply especially in minimally invasive settings.

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3D Guided Endodontics

Guided Endodontics

by Andres Torres, Endodontic specialist, KU Leuven (OMFS-IMPATH), Belgium

This presentation will focus on the latest techniques used in endodontics to achieve success even in the most difficult cases helped by 3D design and printing technologies.
In this method, a digital impression of the patient’s jaw is taken and registered to the data from a CBCT scan. Then, a path for the treatment is created up to the target location on the CBCT scan. Finally, a guide for the bur being used during treatment is designed by means of a computer-aided design (CAD) software and printed using a 3D printer.
The concept of 3D Guided endodontics is becoming a valuable tool among clinicians as it seems to be a promising technique offering a higher predictable outcome and lower risk of iatrogenic damage. Minimally invasive treatment can be performed, and chair-side time can be reduced.

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A SMART Map for 3D Printing in the Biomedical Field

smart map

The SMART Map is a tool that helps businesses address issues of social and environmental responsibility they face in their innovation processes.
It is based on the Responsible Research Innovation (RRI) approach promoted by the European Commission and it provides different stakeholders with practical suggestions on how to promote these principles.

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First human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University (Video)

human corneas

First human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University

It means the technique could be used in the future to ensure an unlimited supply of corneas. As the outermost layer of the human eye, the cornea has an important role in focusing vision.

Yet there is a significant shortage of corneas available to transplant, with 10 million people worldwide requiring surgery to prevent corneal blindness as a result of diseases such as trachoma, an infectious eye disorder.

In addition, almost 5 million people suffer total blindness due to corneal scarring caused by burns, lacerations, abrasion or disease. Continue reading “First human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University (Video)”

Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers

3D skin printer

Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers

University of Toronto researchers have developed a handheld 3D skin printer that deposits even layers of skin tissue to cover and heal deep wounds. The team believes it to be the first device that forms tissue in situ, depositing and setting in place, within two minutes or less.

The research, led by PhD student Navid Hakimi under the supervision of Associate Professor Axel Guenther of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, and in collaboration with Dr. Marc Jeschke, director of the Ross Tilley Burn Centre at Sunnybrook Hospital and professor of immunology at the Faculty of Medicine, was recently published in the journal Lab on a Chip.

For patients with deep skin wounds, all three skin layers – the epidermis, dermis and hypodermis – may be heavily damaged. The current preferred treatment is called split-thickness skin grafting, where healthy donor skin is grafted onto the surface epidermis and part of the underlying dermis. Continue reading “Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers”