A SMART Map for 3D Printing in the Biomedical Field

smart map

The SMART Map is a tool that helps businesses address issues of social and environmental responsibility they face in their innovation processes.
It is based on the Responsible Research Innovation (RRI) approach promoted by the European Commission and it provides different stakeholders with practical suggestions on how to promote these principles.

Continue reading “A SMART Map for 3D Printing in the Biomedical Field”

First human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University (Video)

human corneas

First human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University

It means the technique could be used in the future to ensure an unlimited supply of corneas. As the outermost layer of the human eye, the cornea has an important role in focusing vision.

Yet there is a significant shortage of corneas available to transplant, with 10 million people worldwide requiring surgery to prevent corneal blindness as a result of diseases such as trachoma, an infectious eye disorder.

In addition, almost 5 million people suffer total blindness due to corneal scarring caused by burns, lacerations, abrasion or disease. Continue reading “First human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University (Video)”

Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers

3D skin printer

Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers

University of Toronto researchers have developed a handheld 3D skin printer that deposits even layers of skin tissue to cover and heal deep wounds. The team believes it to be the first device that forms tissue in situ, depositing and setting in place, within two minutes or less.

The research, led by PhD student Navid Hakimi under the supervision of Associate Professor Axel Guenther of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, and in collaboration with Dr. Marc Jeschke, director of the Ross Tilley Burn Centre at Sunnybrook Hospital and professor of immunology at the Faculty of Medicine, was recently published in the journal Lab on a Chip.

For patients with deep skin wounds, all three skin layers – the epidermis, dermis and hypodermis – may be heavily damaged. The current preferred treatment is called split-thickness skin grafting, where healthy donor skin is grafted onto the surface epidermis and part of the underlying dermis. Continue reading “Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers”

New method for 3D printing biological samples enables faster, cheaper models for research & diagnosis

3D printing biological samples

New method for 3D printing biological samples enables faster, cheaper models for research & diagnosis

What if you could hold a physical model of your own brain in your hands, accurate down to its every unique fold? That’s just a normal part of life for Steven Keating, Ph.D., who had a baseball-sized tumor removed from his brain at age 26 while he was a graduate student in the MIT Media Lab’s Mediated Matter group. Curious to see what his brain actually looked like before the tumor was removed, and with the goal of better understanding his diagnosis and treatment options, Keating collected his medical data and began 3D printing his MRI and CT scans, but was frustrated that existing methods were prohibitively time-intensive, cumbersome, and failed to accurately reveal important features of interest. Keating reached out to some of his group’s collaborators, including members of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, who were exploring a new method for 3D printing biological samples. Continue reading “New method for 3D printing biological samples enables faster, cheaper models for research & diagnosis”

Carnegie Mellon University researchers develop low-cost open-source 3D bioprinter (Video)

3D bioprinter

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a low-cost 3D bioprinter by modifying a standard desktop 3-D printer, and they have released the breakthrough designs as open source so that anyone can build their own system. The researchers—Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and Biomedical Engineering (BME) Associate Professor Adam Feinberg, BME postdoctoral fellow TJ Hinton, and Kira Pusch, a recent graduate of the MSE undergraduate program—recently published a paper in the journal HardwareX that contains complete instructions for printing and installing the syringe-based, large volume extruder (LVE) to modify any typical, commercial plastic printer.

“What we’ve created,” says Pusch, “is a large volume syringe pump extruder that works with almost any open source fused deposition modeling (FDM) printer. This means that it’s an inexpensive and relatively easy adaptation for people who use 3-D printers.” Continue reading “Carnegie Mellon University researchers develop low-cost open-source 3D bioprinter (Video)”

Research on the benefits of 3D printing in Dutch trauma hospital (Video)

3D printing

3D printing is seeing increasingly widespread adoption in the medical field, with numerous examples of applications that help surgeons accurately plan cosmetic surgery. Now, the potential of 3D printing is being examined by hospitals treating patients who are fighting for their life.

The ETZ (Elisabeth-TweeSteden Ziekenhuis) is one of the eleven trauma centers in the Netherlands. As the only center in the country with trauma surgeons on location 24 hours a day, it serves as the main location for emergency patients in North Brabant. 3D printing has already been used to visualize bone fractures, but pioneering researchers believe it can also be used to help treat trauma patients.

Mike Bemelman, MD, trauma surgeon at the ETZ, had already seen the potential of 3D printing back in 2016. Together with Lars Brouwers, MD, PhD-candidate, and Koen Lansink, MD, trauma surgeon, they have started conducting research into the benefits and effectiveness of 3D printing, compared to traditional and other new technologies. Their idea is to 3D print scanned bone fractures in order to give both surgeons and patients a clear understanding of each situation, before operating. Continue reading “Research on the benefits of 3D printing in Dutch trauma hospital (Video)”

Bryce Nelson, Merck Life Science, will speak at 3D Medical Printing Conference

bryce nelson

Bryce Nelson, Merck Life Science, will speak at 3D Medical Printing Conference,  which will take place on 30-31 January 2018 at MECC Maastricht, The Netherlands.

About Bryce Nelson
Bryce Nelson earned his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA) in 2001, where he developed new, label-free biomolecule detection methods. After a post-doc in Molecular and Plant Pathology, Bryce helped to form a startup company making innovative protein detection products. He held various positions in R&D, Technology and Business Development. Bryce joined Sigma-Aldrich in 2011, first as a Technology Transfer Manager and later as the Director of Product Management and R&D for Materials Science. After the acquisition of Sigma-Aldrich by Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Bryce became Head of the Materials Science franchise within Merck Life Science. Continue reading “Bryce Nelson, Merck Life Science, will speak at 3D Medical Printing Conference”

Additive manufacturing to revolutionise personalized regenerative medicine – Holger Jahr, UK RWTH Aachen

Holger Jahr

Additive manufacturing to revolutionise personalized regenerative medicine – Holger Jahr, UK RWTH Aachen

Holger Jahr is Secretary-General of the European Orthopaedic Research Society and director of the Orthopaedic research lab at the University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen. He holds an associate professorship in Experimental Orthopaedics and honorary appointments with the Maastricht UMC+ and TU Delft. His research focuses on regenerative biomaterials for musculoskeletal disorders. In 2017, he received the Klee Family Innovation Award for his work on lattice structured 3D-printed metal implants. On January 31, 2018, he will speak during the 3D Medical Printing Conference in Maastricht about Additive manufacturing (resorbable) metal implants for orthopaedic applications

What drives you? Continue reading “Additive manufacturing to revolutionise personalized regenerative medicine – Holger Jahr, UK RWTH Aachen”

FabRx starts crowdfunding campaign for personalised medicine 3D Printer

FabRx

FabRx starts crowdfunding campaign for personalised medicine 3D Printer

The new printer and software produces personalised medicines adapted for individual patients’ needs

FabRx is the first pharmaceutical company to work and act on the dream of personalised medicines using 3D printing technology. FabRx, in partnership with The Magic Candy Factory are working together to adapt a confectionary 3D printer to prepare medicines that are ideal for children. FabRx announces the starting of a crowdfunding campaign to raise money and create awareness about this innovative technology on Wednesday 6th December. You can find more information about the Kickstarter campaign in the following link:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1533832013/1462390728?ref=363525&token=547920b8

The new printer allows the tailored manufacturing of medicines, including:

•          precise dose medication (personalised doses)
•          the combination of more than one drug (Polypill)
•          a range of formulations (tablets, capsules, chewable formulations) and
•          preparing these medicines on-demand in hospitals or pharmacies Continue reading “FabRx starts crowdfunding campaign for personalised medicine 3D Printer”

Materialise announce pre-market phase of development for mitral valve planning

Materialise

Materialise announce pre-market phase of development for mitral valve planning

Mitral regurgitation affects more than 4 million Americans – nearly one in 10 people aged 75 or older. Currently the primary option for the disease is open-heart surgery, which holds extremely high risks for patients in this age group and can prevent treatment in many cases. Non-invasive methods are entering the market to address this need and physicians are recognizing the importance of pre-surgical planning for this complex disease. Entering their pre-market phase of development, Materialise is working with select U.S. and EU hospital partners to validate the importance of accurate 3D modeling to help physicians plan complex transcatheter mitral valve replacement & repair (TMVR/r) procedures.

The pre-market phase will assess the importance of accurate 3D modeling for robust, repeatable patient planning. Materialise has partnered with Henry Ford Health Systems to bring Henry Ford’s validated, patented, mitral planning workflow, developed in Materialise’s Mimics Innovation Suite to a broader TMVR Market. Continue reading “Materialise announce pre-market phase of development for mitral valve planning”