Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers

3D skin printer

Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers

University of Toronto researchers have developed a handheld 3D skin printer that deposits even layers of skin tissue to cover and heal deep wounds. The team believes it to be the first device that forms tissue in situ, depositing and setting in place, within two minutes or less.

The research, led by PhD student Navid Hakimi under the supervision of Associate Professor Axel Guenther of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, and in collaboration with Dr. Marc Jeschke, director of the Ross Tilley Burn Centre at Sunnybrook Hospital and professor of immunology at the Faculty of Medicine, was recently published in the journal Lab on a Chip.

For patients with deep skin wounds, all three skin layers – the epidermis, dermis and hypodermis – may be heavily damaged. The current preferred treatment is called split-thickness skin grafting, where healthy donor skin is grafted onto the surface epidermis and part of the underlying dermis. Continue reading “Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers”

Research on the benefits of 3D printing in Dutch trauma hospital (Video)

3D printing

3D printing is seeing increasingly widespread adoption in the medical field, with numerous examples of applications that help surgeons accurately plan cosmetic surgery. Now, the potential of 3D printing is being examined by hospitals treating patients who are fighting for their life.

The ETZ (Elisabeth-TweeSteden Ziekenhuis) is one of the eleven trauma centers in the Netherlands. As the only center in the country with trauma surgeons on location 24 hours a day, it serves as the main location for emergency patients in North Brabant. 3D printing has already been used to visualize bone fractures, but pioneering researchers believe it can also be used to help treat trauma patients.

Mike Bemelman, MD, trauma surgeon at the ETZ, had already seen the potential of 3D printing back in 2016. Together with Lars Brouwers, MD, PhD-candidate, and Koen Lansink, MD, trauma surgeon, they have started conducting research into the benefits and effectiveness of 3D printing, compared to traditional and other new technologies. Their idea is to 3D print scanned bone fractures in order to give both surgeons and patients a clear understanding of each situation, before operating. Continue reading “Research on the benefits of 3D printing in Dutch trauma hospital (Video)”

FabRx starts crowdfunding campaign for personalised medicine 3D Printer

FabRx

FabRx starts crowdfunding campaign for personalised medicine 3D Printer

The new printer and software produces personalised medicines adapted for individual patients’ needs

FabRx is the first pharmaceutical company to work and act on the dream of personalised medicines using 3D printing technology. FabRx, in partnership with The Magic Candy Factory are working together to adapt a confectionary 3D printer to prepare medicines that are ideal for children. FabRx announces the starting of a crowdfunding campaign to raise money and create awareness about this innovative technology on Wednesday 6th December. You can find more information about the Kickstarter campaign in the following link:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1533832013/1462390728?ref=363525&token=547920b8

The new printer allows the tailored manufacturing of medicines, including:

•          precise dose medication (personalised doses)
•          the combination of more than one drug (Polypill)
•          a range of formulations (tablets, capsules, chewable formulations) and
•          preparing these medicines on-demand in hospitals or pharmacies Continue reading “FabRx starts crowdfunding campaign for personalised medicine 3D Printer”

ETH researchers develop silicone heart that beats almost like a human heart (Video)

silicone heart

ETH researchers from the Functional Materials Laboratory have developed a silicone heart that beats almost like a human heart. In collaboration with colleagues from the Product Development Group Zurich, they have tested how well it works.

It looks like a real heart. And this is the goal of the first entirely soft artificial heart: to mimic its natural model as closely as possible. The silicone heart has been developed by Nicholas Cohrs, a doctoral student in the group led by Wendelin Stark, Professor of Functional Materials Engineering at ETH Zurich. The reasoning why nature should be used as a model is clear. Currently used blood pumps have many disadvantages: their mechanical parts are susceptible to complications while the patient lacks a physiological pulse, which is assumed to have some consequences for the patient. Continue reading “ETH researchers develop silicone heart that beats almost like a human heart (Video)”

Researchers are 3D printing replica human vertebrae to help in surgery room (Video)

replica human vertebrae

Researchers are 3D printing replica human vertebrae to help in surgery room

A project led by Nottingham Trent University aims to give trainee surgeons the “tacit knowledge” of how it feels to partly remove or drill into vertebrae before undertaking procedures on patients.

The models – which are created using powder printing technology to help achieve a lifelike porosity of real bone – feature hard outer layers and a softer centre.

“Consultants undertaking delicate and precise procedures like spinal surgery need as much knowledge and experience as possible as part of their surgical training before going into live operations,” said Professor Philip Breedon, of the university’s Design for Health and Wellbeing Group.

“One error can lead to catastrophic, life-changing consequences for a patient, so it’s imperative that surgeons can prepare themselves thoroughly. Continue reading “Researchers are 3D printing replica human vertebrae to help in surgery room (Video)”

GE Healthcare opens first 3D Printing lab

GE Healthcare

GE Healthcare opens first 3D Printing lab

GE Healthcare has opened its first 3D printing lab, called the Innovative Design and Advanced Manufacturing Technology Center for Europe, in Uppsala, Sweden. The center will use technologies including 3D printing and robotics to speed up the launch of new innovative products for the healthcare industry.

The center combines advanced manufacturing technology such as metal and polymer printers and collaborative robots, or “cobots”, with traditional machining equipment. A key in realizing the advantages of 3D printing is ensuring the technology is considered at the start of the innovation process with Research and Design teams working with advanced manufacturing engineers and in collaboration with customers. The new center in Uppsala will ensure additive expertise is available from the start of product design. Teams will design, test and produce 3D-printed parts for GE Healthcare products and prepare for final transfer to manufacturing. Continue reading “GE Healthcare opens first 3D Printing lab”

3D printing is quickly reshaping the medical device landscape

medical device landscape

3D printing is quickly reshaping the medical device landscape

As news of the latest advancement in experimental 3D printing of tissue and organ regeneration gains attention, it would be easy to believe that 3D printing in the medical field only happens in the lab. However, new equipment and devices are being 3D printed now and in real world settings.

After years of feasibility studies, 3D printing for medical equipment and prostheses is becoming reality.

Reports have continually shown that 3D printed devices are both practical and less expensive than traditional options. For example, a University of South Florida study related to prosthesis molds found that “Owing to the similarity of the 3D printed materials and the traditional materials, the 3D printed molds are easily integrated into current processing procedures.” And a UK study observed that 3D printed sensors added onto a prosthesis could help medical professionals increase comfort levels for the prosthesis wearer. In addition to better comfort, these sensors improved overall patient care. Continue reading “3D printing is quickly reshaping the medical device landscape”

Brave new world of 3D printed organs now includes implanted ovary structures (Video)

3D printed organs

The brave new world of 3D printed organs now includes implanted ovary structures that, true to their design, actually ovulate, according to a study by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and McCormick School of Engineering.

By removing a female mouse’s ovary and replacing it with a bioprosthetic ovary, the mouse was able to not only ovulate but also give birth to healthy pups. The moms were even able to nurse their young.

The bioprosthetic ovaries are constructed of 3-D printed scaffolds that house immature eggs, and have been successful in boosting hormone production and restoring fertility in mice, which was the ultimate goal of the research. Continue reading “Brave new world of 3D printed organs now includes implanted ovary structures (Video)”

Bench testing of additive manufactured orthopedic devices: case study on Ankle Foot Orthosis and transtibial socket – Presented by Luiza Muraru & Tom Saey, Mobilab

Bench testing of additive manufactured orthopedic devices: case study on Ankle Foot Orthosis and transtibial socket – Presented by Luiza Muraru, Researcher, Mobilab, Thomas More University College, Belgium, & Tom Saey, Researcher, Mobilab, Thomas More University College, Belgium, at the 3D Medtech Printing Conference, which takes place on Feb 01 2017 at MECC Maastricht in The Netherlands. Continue reading “Bench testing of additive manufactured orthopedic devices: case study on Ankle Foot Orthosis and transtibial socket – Presented by Luiza Muraru & Tom Saey, Mobilab”