Cryptopharmaceuticals & personalised drug delivery systems to dramatically change pharma manufacturing & distribution

pharma

Digitalization in the medical field opens up new opportunities for personalized pharmaceuticals as well. 3D Printing techniques are creating great opportunities for personalised drug delivery systems. Drug dosage form production and manufacture will be dramatically changed once the problems of right materials and regulatory issues are solved. But what is the current status? Where are we now, what are the most challenging issues we are confronted with and what are the next steps?

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How are 3D printing & digital technology changing dentistry?

dentistry

3D printing & digital technology have been gaining grounds in the dental practice in the recent years. Additive technologies, such as DLP are widely used to build, starting from digital files, dental models in addition to orthodontic and prosthetic devices. 3D printed patient specific implants are used more and more in clinical cases. The start-up Lake3D wants to develop the first 3D Dental printer based on Multi Material 3D inkjet.

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What is the stage of 3D printing implementation in hospitals?

hospitals

An increasing number of hospitals across the world started to adopt 3D printing programs, aiming to improve quality, reduce lead times and to personalize patient care.

The 3D printing market can be categorized as medical implants, surgical guides, surgical instruments, hearing aids and personalized medical products. The medical implant segment is expected to grow at the fastest rate among all applications in the coming years.

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VTT Finland is developing 3D technology for wound care

3D technology

VTT Finland is developing 3D technology for wound care

Cellulose nanofibrils have properties that can improve the characteristics of bio-based 3D-printing pastes. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is developing a 3D wound care product for monitoring wound condition in hospital care. However, the first commercial nanocellulose applications will be seen in indoor decoration elements, textiles and the production of mock-ups.

3D printing has proven to be an efficient manufacturing method for complex, customised and light structures. In addition to thermoplastics, 3D printing materials include metals, ceramics and foodstuffs. The range of biomaterials in 3D paste printing is still fairly limited, since pastes pose unique challenges: their structure must not collapse during printing and the objects manufactured must remain sufficiently strong, rigid or flexible after drying. In 3D biomaterial filaments, however, commercial products already exist. Continue reading “VTT Finland is developing 3D technology for wound care”

Researchers Develop 3D Printing in Gel Technique that Can Be Used in Tissue Engineering (Video)

To improve 3D printing, simply add gel. A fresh technique uses one to support complex shapes that would fall apart under their own weight in normal 3D printing.

This new-found combination of strength and delicacy will be crucial if we’re ever to print the biological structures that make up organs, blood vessels and other tissue.

The gel, which has the consistency of hand sanitiser, is made of an acrylic acid polymer. It works like a scaffold, allowing the printing of intricate patterns that would collapse without its support – such as nested Russian-doll-like structures and thin, complex branching networks. Continue reading “Researchers Develop 3D Printing in Gel Technique that Can Be Used in Tissue Engineering (Video)”

3D Technology Shows its Best Potential in Medicine

Nowadays, 3D technology is applied in many fields, from industrial production, through fashion, to the food industry. It is in medicine, however, that 3D technology shows its potential at its best.

At the beginning of 2014, history was made at University Medical Center (UMC) in Utrecht, Netherlands: a skull of a 22-year-old woman was completely replaced by a tailor-made 3D printed plastic skull. The patient was suffering from a condition that thickens the bone structure of the cranium, which causes an increasing pressure of the brain leading to vision loss, motor coordination impairment and, eventually, death. Continue reading “3D Technology Shows its Best Potential in Medicine”