Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers

3D skin printer

Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers

University of Toronto researchers have developed a handheld 3D skin printer that deposits even layers of skin tissue to cover and heal deep wounds. The team believes it to be the first device that forms tissue in situ, depositing and setting in place, within two minutes or less.

The research, led by PhD student Navid Hakimi under the supervision of Associate Professor Axel Guenther of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, and in collaboration with Dr. Marc Jeschke, director of the Ross Tilley Burn Centre at Sunnybrook Hospital and professor of immunology at the Faculty of Medicine, was recently published in the journal Lab on a Chip.

For patients with deep skin wounds, all three skin layers – the epidermis, dermis and hypodermis – may be heavily damaged. The current preferred treatment is called split-thickness skin grafting, where healthy donor skin is grafted onto the surface epidermis and part of the underlying dermis. Continue reading “Portable 3D skin printer to heal deep wounds, developed by University of Toronto researchers”

Carnegie Mellon University researchers develop low-cost open-source 3D bioprinter (Video)

3D bioprinter

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a low-cost 3D bioprinter by modifying a standard desktop 3-D printer, and they have released the breakthrough designs as open source so that anyone can build their own system. The researchers—Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and Biomedical Engineering (BME) Associate Professor Adam Feinberg, BME postdoctoral fellow TJ Hinton, and Kira Pusch, a recent graduate of the MSE undergraduate program—recently published a paper in the journal HardwareX that contains complete instructions for printing and installing the syringe-based, large volume extruder (LVE) to modify any typical, commercial plastic printer.

“What we’ve created,” says Pusch, “is a large volume syringe pump extruder that works with almost any open source fused deposition modeling (FDM) printer. This means that it’s an inexpensive and relatively easy adaptation for people who use 3-D printers.” Continue reading “Carnegie Mellon University researchers develop low-cost open-source 3D bioprinter (Video)”

Multimaterial and Multiscale Biofabrication of 3D in vitro models of complex tissues – Presented by Giovanni Vozzi, University of Pisa

Giovanni Vozzi

Multimaterial and Multiscale Biofabrication of 3D in vitro models of complex tissues – Presented by Giovanni Vozzi, University of Pisa, at the 3D Medical Conference, which will take place on 30-31 January 2018 at MECC Maastricht, The Netherlands. Read the interview

A biological tissue is a composite material with “bottom-up” hierarchical structure that is closely related to its heterogeneous function. The extracellular matrix modulates biochemical and biophysical signalling, and its rigidity is an important microenvironmental parameter that regulates the spatiotemporal dynamics of intercellular signalling. For this reason, many studies are focused on fabricating scaffolds processed at multiple scales with structural and mechanical properties that are optimal for eliciting specific response or mimic those found naturally. These scaffolds have to present large surface areas that have appropriate topology and biochemical cues (e.g, ligands) at the nanoscale for tissue adhesion, while also exhibiting integral porosity to allow for the exchange of molecules that maintain cellular function.

In this talk, the use of a multiscale and multimaterial process will be presented to develop 3D in vitro model that can mimic the 3D complexity of natural tissue. These novel 3D in vitro models can be used for the study of physio-pathological condition and for the analysis of effects on cell activities of different biomolecule and/or drugs. Continue reading “Multimaterial and Multiscale Biofabrication of 3D in vitro models of complex tissues – Presented by Giovanni Vozzi, University of Pisa”

New method to 3D Print laboratory-grown cells to form living structures, developed by Oxford researchers

3D Print laboratory-grown cells

New method to 3D Print laboratory-grown cells to form living structures, developed by Oxford researchers

The approach could revolutionise regenerative medicine, enabling the production of complex tissues and cartilage that would potentially support, repair or augment diseased and damaged areas of the body.

Printing high-resolution living tissues is hard to do, as the cells often move within printed structures and can collapse on themselves. But, led by Professor Hagan Bayley, Professor of Chemical Biology in Oxford’s Department of Chemistry, the team devised a way to produce tissues in self-contained cells that support the structures to keep their shape.

The cells were contained within protective nanolitre droplets wrapped in a lipid coating that could be assembled, layer-by-layer, into living structures. Producing printed tissues in this way improves the survival rate of the individual cells, and allowed the team to improve on current techniques by building each tissue one drop at a time to a more favourable resolution. Continue reading “New method to 3D Print laboratory-grown cells to form living structures, developed by Oxford researchers”

Is Herston Biofabrication Institute creating the hospital of the future?

Herston Biofabrication Institute

Is Herston Biofabrication Institute creating the hospital of the future? Advances in biofabrication research led by the Herston Biofabrication Institute will transform the way we provide health care by producing innovative personalized and automated treatments.

The Herston Biofabrication Institute is a partnership between Metro North Hospital and Health Service, and QUT.

Launching in 2017, the Herston Biofabrication Institute will advance knowledge and technology in 3D scanning, modelling and printing of bone, cartilage and other human tissue to repair tissue that is lost or damaged. Continue reading “Is Herston Biofabrication Institute creating the hospital of the future?”

Utrecht3DMedical – 3D Bioprinting Lab in Utrecht

The city of Utrecht in Netherland is already famous for the outstanding achievements made by the tissue factory subordinated to the University Medical Center Utrecht to a great extent. This tissue factory has recently accomplished the 3D bioprinted rabbit shoulder implantation experiment. Now, this city is attracting more biologic printing institutions. With the cooperation of the University Medical Center Utrecht, Hogeschool Utrecht and ProtoSpace Fund, a new bioprinting lab Utrecht3DMedical is established. Continue reading “Utrecht3DMedical – 3D Bioprinting Lab in Utrecht”

Cutting-edge 3D printing techniques have been leveraged in the biomedical engineering field using bioinks

THREE-dimensional (3D) printing continues to drive innovations in many disciplines, including engineering, manufacturing, aerospace, global security, and medicine, to name only a few. Most 3D products are made of plastics or metals, but cutting-edge 3D printing techniques have been leveraged in the biomedical engineering field using bioinks—a fluid with biological components—to manufacture vascularized tissue. Once refined, this approach could be used to engineer complete human organs for implantation and to assess medical treatments. Continue reading “Cutting-edge 3D printing techniques have been leveraged in the biomedical engineering field using bioinks”

Researchers Develop 3D Bioprinting Method that Produces Uniform Blocks of Embryonic Stem Cells

When it comes to 3D bioprinting with stem cells the obvious endgame is the ability to produce complex living tissue, such as replacement organs or biological matter. The potential future applications would completely change the world in numerous ways that are difficult to even predict. Transplant organs grown from a patient’s own DNA would be only one of the many uses of complex 3D bioprinted tissue; animal testing could be rendered completely unnecessary, as would the slaughter of animals as a food source. And while we are probably decades away from being able to produce even the simplest of living tissues, researchers and scientists are inching ever closer. Continue reading “Researchers Develop 3D Bioprinting Method that Produces Uniform Blocks of Embryonic Stem Cells”

Bioprinting: Ushering in a new era of medicine

A year and a half ago, Dr. Albert Chi, a surgeon at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and an expert in prosthetic devices, was talking to a group of parents whose children suffered from congenital limb loss. He told them that prices don’t make it feasible to fit children with advanced prosthetic devices — kids will outgrow them in months, and more money will have to be spent upsizing a prosthetic hand or limb. That’s when one parent challenged Chi: Hadn’t he heard of 3-D printing? Continue reading “Bioprinting: Ushering in a new era of medicine”