Announcement by Servier and Poietis of scientific partnership in 4D bioprinting of liver tissues

Servier and Poietis

Announcement by Servier and Poietis of scientific partnership in 4D bioprinting of liver tissues

Paris and Pessac, France – 19 September 2018 – Servier, an independent international pharmaceutical company, and Poietis, a leader in the production of living bioprinted tissues, have announced a scientific partnership to use Poietis’s 4D bioprinting technology for the development and production of liver tissues.

This partnership seeks to improve the detection of drug-induced liver lesions as early as the preclinical trial phase. Such lesions are rare1 but can have serious consequences for patients. This hepatotoxic2 potential is poorly detected by current preclinical models. Beyond animal models, various models based on human cell cultures are available, but most lack longevity and complexity, which limits their usefulness in toxicology. Poietis’s 4D bioprinting technology has emerged as an innovative technology capable of helping to overcome these limitations. Continue reading “Announcement by Servier and Poietis of scientific partnership in 4D bioprinting of liver tissues”

Is developing 3D bioink for all cell types & all printing techniques achievable?

3D bioink

Is developing 3D bioink for all cell types & all printing techniques achievable?

The concept of developing a bioink that can be used for all cell types and all printing techniques is at best unrealistic and at worst impossible.  What is much more achievable and also more desirable is a modifiable, modular system. A base material in which mechanical properties can be easily adapted for the chosen additive method and then formulated for each specific cell type or multiple cell types involved in the end application. Continue reading “Is developing 3D bioink for all cell types & all printing techniques achievable?”

Carnegie Mellon University researchers develop low-cost open-source 3D bioprinter (Video)

3D bioprinter

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a low-cost 3D bioprinter by modifying a standard desktop 3-D printer, and they have released the breakthrough designs as open source so that anyone can build their own system. The researchers—Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and Biomedical Engineering (BME) Associate Professor Adam Feinberg, BME postdoctoral fellow TJ Hinton, and Kira Pusch, a recent graduate of the MSE undergraduate program—recently published a paper in the journal HardwareX that contains complete instructions for printing and installing the syringe-based, large volume extruder (LVE) to modify any typical, commercial plastic printer.

“What we’ve created,” says Pusch, “is a large volume syringe pump extruder that works with almost any open source fused deposition modeling (FDM) printer. This means that it’s an inexpensive and relatively easy adaptation for people who use 3-D printers.” Continue reading “Carnegie Mellon University researchers develop low-cost open-source 3D bioprinter (Video)”

Johnson & Johnson to open 3D bioprinting lab at Trinity College Dublin

3D bioprinting lab

AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland-funded materials science institute headquartered at Trinity, today announced a new strategic collaboration with Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc. to establish a collaborative laboratory focused on 3D bioprinting.

Research projects will focus initially in orthopaedics and, in the long-term, offer its internal scientific experts as adjunct professors and engage in staff exchanges. The new Global Centre of Excellence for 3D bioprinting will transform healthcare delivery for patients and consumers. It is due to be operational by the end of 2018.

The announcement was welcomed by Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation, Heather Humphreys TD, who said: “Because of the fantastic success of the SFI Research Centre, AMBER, Ireland has a worldwide reputation for excellence in 3D bioprinting and is a global leader in materials science. I am delighted to welcome this new collaboration and look forward to its success moving forward.” Continue reading “Johnson & Johnson to open 3D bioprinting lab at Trinity College Dublin”

3D printing and programming genetically engineered bacteria

genetically engineered bacteria

Wearable tech is the name given to smart electronic devices that can be worn or implanted in the body. An enticing opportunity for innovative tech developers in sports, health, fashion and entertainment, 3D printing is revealing new possibilities for wearable tech such as electronic second skins, and smart fabrics.

In the latest research from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), a team has developed a “living” 3D printer bio-ink that’s not only smart but could change the way we think about technology altogether. Harnessing natural reactions of bacteria, responsive devices made using this smart ink represent the basic build blocks of electricity-free wearable tech.

Made by members of the same team that made the soft-robotic, fish-catching glove, this 3D printable bio-ink adds to an extensive portfolio of smart materials in development at MIT. Continue reading “3D printing and programming genetically engineered bacteria”

3D printing in medicine: How the technology is increasingly being used to save lives (VIDEO)

3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, used to be the manufacturing industry’s best kept secret but now the technology is being used to transform many industries, including medicine. Over the past year, hospitals around the world have begun talking about their burgeoning use of 3D printing in health care, … Continue reading “3D printing in medicine: How the technology is increasingly being used to save lives (VIDEO)”