First human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University (Video)

human corneas

First human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University

It means the technique could be used in the future to ensure an unlimited supply of corneas. As the outermost layer of the human eye, the cornea has an important role in focusing vision.

Yet there is a significant shortage of corneas available to transplant, with 10 million people worldwide requiring surgery to prevent corneal blindness as a result of diseases such as trachoma, an infectious eye disorder.

In addition, almost 5 million people suffer total blindness due to corneal scarring caused by burns, lacerations, abrasion or disease. Continue reading “First human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University (Video)”

Carnegie Mellon University researchers develop low-cost open-source 3D bioprinter (Video)

3D bioprinter

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a low-cost 3D bioprinter by modifying a standard desktop 3-D printer, and they have released the breakthrough designs as open source so that anyone can build their own system. The researchers—Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and Biomedical Engineering (BME) Associate Professor Adam Feinberg, BME postdoctoral fellow TJ Hinton, and Kira Pusch, a recent graduate of the MSE undergraduate program—recently published a paper in the journal HardwareX that contains complete instructions for printing and installing the syringe-based, large volume extruder (LVE) to modify any typical, commercial plastic printer.

“What we’ve created,” says Pusch, “is a large volume syringe pump extruder that works with almost any open source fused deposition modeling (FDM) printer. This means that it’s an inexpensive and relatively easy adaptation for people who use 3-D printers.” Continue reading “Carnegie Mellon University researchers develop low-cost open-source 3D bioprinter (Video)”

Moroni Lab – Largest European 3D bioprinting program launched by Maastricht University, Brightlands Materials Center

3D bioprinting program

Moroni Lab – Largest European 3D bioprinting program launched by Maastricht University, Brightlands Materials Center. It looks like Maastricht University is rapidly becoming one of Europe’s key centers for medical 3D printing efforts. Just this month, they spearheaded the new €4.6 million PRosPERoS project for 3D printed joint implant development, while researchers from Maastricht’s Moroni lab pioneered 3D bioprinted scaffolds that control stem cell differentiation. Continue reading “Moroni Lab – Largest European 3D bioprinting program launched by Maastricht University, Brightlands Materials Center”

New bioprinting technology to be developed by UMC Utrecht, regenHU (VIDEO)

bioprinting

New bioprinting technology to be developed by UMC Utrecht, regenHU. Partnering experts in 3D bioprinting with experts in biomanufacturing has resulted in the first melt electrospinning device that incorporates the use of bio-inks. Housed at the Utrecht Biofabrication Facility, this combination of techniques may lead to improved and more accurate 3D bioprinting for therapeutic use. The Utrecht Biofabrication Facility was established with support of Utrecht University and the UMC Utrecht in 2013. Continue reading “New bioprinting technology to be developed by UMC Utrecht, regenHU (VIDEO)”

Partnership for bio-printing of hair, signed by Poietis and L’Oreal

bio-printing

Partnership for bio-printing of hair, signed by Poietis and L’Oreal. L’Oreal has been committed to tissue engineering for almost 30 years and holds unique knowledge and expertise in the field of bio-printing of hair. With this exclusive research partnership, L’Oreal and Poietis are giving themselves the means to pursue a new scientific challenge: bio-printing a hair follicle, the small organ that produces hair, using a bio-printer. Continue reading “Partnership for bio-printing of hair, signed by Poietis and L’Oreal”

Harvard Researchers Reveal New Method for 3D Bioprinting Thick Vascularized Tissue (Video)

A team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard John A. Paulson School for Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has invented a method for 3D bioprinting thick vascularized tissue constructs composed of human stem cells, extracellular matrix, and circulatory channels lined with endothelial blood vessel cells. The resulting network of vasculature contained within these deep tissues enables fluids, nutrients and cell growth factors to be controllably perfused uniformly throughout the tissue. The advance is reported March 7 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Continue reading “Harvard Researchers Reveal New Method for 3D Bioprinting Thick Vascularized Tissue (Video)”

Bioprinting: Ushering in a new era of medicine

A year and a half ago, Dr. Albert Chi, a surgeon at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and an expert in prosthetic devices, was talking to a group of parents whose children suffered from congenital limb loss. He told them that prices don’t make it feasible to fit children with advanced prosthetic devices — kids will outgrow them in months, and more money will have to be spent upsizing a prosthetic hand or limb. That’s when one parent challenged Chi: Hadn’t he heard of 3-D printing? Continue reading “Bioprinting: Ushering in a new era of medicine”

Timpanic Membrane Bioprinted at Maastricht University

Cartilage we can already bioprint with discrete success, as the many images of bioprinted ears circulating around the web clearly seem to demonstrate. But how can we make those ears actually function? For that, we need much more advanced biofabrication processes. What scientists need to do is to find a way to accurately and efficiently 3D print the scaffolds that enable the creation of “end-use”, implantable, complex cartilage implants. Continue reading “Timpanic Membrane Bioprinted at Maastricht University”

New 3D stem cell printing breakthrough could pave the way to individually tailored drug testing regimes

A new breakthrough by the 3D stem cell printing team at Heriot-Watt could pave the way to individually tailored drug testing regimes, both reducing the need for animal testing and ensuring that patients receive drugs which are most effective for their individual needs.

The team, led Dr Will Shu, at the School of Engineering and Physical Sciences (EPS), originally put together the first 3D printer capable of working with delicate stem cells, a valve-based technique sensitive enough to print the sensitive cultures without damaging them. Continue reading “New 3D stem cell printing breakthrough could pave the way to individually tailored drug testing regimes”

Organovo Patents Methodology for Producing Kidney Cells from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

UniQuest, the main technology transfer and commercialisation company of The University of Queensland (UQ), has signed an exclusive worldwide licensing agreement with Organovo Holdings, Inc. (NYSE MKT:ONVO), a three-dimensional biology company focused on delivering scientific and medical breakthroughs using its 3D bioprinting technology, to patent applications relating to methodology for producing kidney cells from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

Professor Melissa Little and her team at UQ’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience developed a method of growing kidney tissue from iPSCs for potential use in drug screening, disease modelling and cell therapy. Continue reading “Organovo Patents Methodology for Producing Kidney Cells from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells”