First Living Cellular Bioink Kits to Be Made Commercially Available

Sometimes it is difficult to tell the difference between news about advances in medicine and the plot for a B movie horror film. The latest developments related to bioprinting are just that kind of material and yet they are part of what is actually happening as medicine and 3D printing technology continue to work together. Just this week, CELLINK and RoosterBio have announced a partnership that allows them to pool their complementary technologies and make Cellular Bioink Kits commercially available. Continue reading “First Living Cellular Bioink Kits to Be Made Commercially Available”

“Biofabrication: Print your heart out” – Presented by Dirk-Jan Cornelissen, Heriot-Watt University

New drugs can take more than 10 years to develop, and only around 16% of drug candidates that begin pre-clinical testing are approved for human use. This low success rate is partially due to the different responses of humans and the animal models currently used for testing. A key challenge in bioprinting has been the development of more gentle printing processes to preserve cellular functions. By encapsulating cells inside a gel, complex 3D structures can be printed with cells suspended throughout. Continue reading ““Biofabrication: Print your heart out” – Presented by Dirk-Jan Cornelissen, Heriot-Watt University”

3D Technology Shows its Best Potential in Medicine

Nowadays, 3D technology is applied in many fields, from industrial production, through fashion, to the food industry. It is in medicine, however, that 3D technology shows its potential at its best.

At the beginning of 2014, history was made at University Medical Center (UMC) in Utrecht, Netherlands: a skull of a 22-year-old woman was completely replaced by a tailor-made 3D printed plastic skull. The patient was suffering from a condition that thickens the bone structure of the cranium, which causes an increasing pressure of the brain leading to vision loss, motor coordination impairment and, eventually, death. Continue reading “3D Technology Shows its Best Potential in Medicine”

Technique Produces ‘Organoids’ Useful in Cancer Research, Drug Screening

A UCSF-led team has developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissues, called organoids, more precisely than ever before using a process that turns human cells into a biological equivalent of LEGO bricks. These mini-tissues in a dish can be used to study how particular structural features of tissue affect normal growth or go awry in cancer. They could be used for therapeutic drug screening and to help teach researchers how to grow whole human organs. Continue reading “Technique Produces ‘Organoids’ Useful in Cancer Research, Drug Screening”

‘Bio-3D printer’- based system to create vascular prosthetics (Video)

Small caliber vascular prostheses are not clinically available because synthetic vascular prostheses lack endothelial cells which modulate platelet activation, leukocyte adhesion, thrombosis, and the regulation of vasomotor tone by the production of vasoactive substances. We developed a novel method to create scaffold-free tubular tissue from multicellular spheroids (MCS) using a “Bio-3D printer”-based system. This system enables the creation of pre-designed three-dimensional structures using a computer controlled robotics system. With this system, we created a tubular structure and studied its biological features. Continue reading “‘Bio-3D printer’- based system to create vascular prosthetics (Video)”

3D Bioprinting Space – Understanding the Fundamentals

For medicine, bioprinting is a necessity and an inevitability. The demand for organs will undoubtedly continue to climb with the global median age. Yet what hurdles lie in the way of creating a renewable supply? One major engineering obstacle is properly seeding and feeding the culture in order to create a functional organ. This is because complex tissues are composed of many different types of cells precisely arranged in 3 dimensions. Continue reading “3D Bioprinting Space – Understanding the Fundamentals”

Aspect Biosystems to Develop New Bioprinting Tech with Seed Funding

With their bioprinting technology, Canada’s Aspect Biosystems is working towards the noble goal of “a future where doctors determine which drugs work for their patients before prescribing them, where animals are no longer needed for the development of new therapeutics, and where lifesaving transplant organs are created, not harvested.” Continue reading “Aspect Biosystems to Develop New Bioprinting Tech with Seed Funding”

British PhD student 3D prints on inflatable substrate to create artificial muscles

A Nottingham PhD student shows us that 3D printing technology can do a lot more for the medical world than just bioprinting. For Fergal Coulter, a lecturer and PhD candidate at the College of Art & Design and Build Environment at the Nottingham Trent University, is using 3D printing and scanning techniques to create artificial muscles. Continue reading “British PhD student 3D prints on inflatable substrate to create artificial muscles”