GE Healthcare opens first 3D Printing lab

GE Healthcare

GE Healthcare opens first 3D Printing lab

GE Healthcare has opened its first 3D printing lab, called the Innovative Design and Advanced Manufacturing Technology Center for Europe, in Uppsala, Sweden. The center will use technologies including 3D printing and robotics to speed up the launch of new innovative products for the healthcare industry.

The center combines advanced manufacturing technology such as metal and polymer printers and collaborative robots, or “cobots”, with traditional machining equipment. A key in realizing the advantages of 3D printing is ensuring the technology is considered at the start of the innovation process with Research and Design teams working with advanced manufacturing engineers and in collaboration with customers. The new center in Uppsala will ensure additive expertise is available from the start of product design. Teams will design, test and produce 3D-printed parts for GE Healthcare products and prepare for final transfer to manufacturing. Continue reading “GE Healthcare opens first 3D Printing lab”

VTT Finland is developing 3D technology for wound care

3D technology

VTT Finland is developing 3D technology for wound care

Cellulose nanofibrils have properties that can improve the characteristics of bio-based 3D-printing pastes. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is developing a 3D wound care product for monitoring wound condition in hospital care. However, the first commercial nanocellulose applications will be seen in indoor decoration elements, textiles and the production of mock-ups.

3D printing has proven to be an efficient manufacturing method for complex, customised and light structures. In addition to thermoplastics, 3D printing materials include metals, ceramics and foodstuffs. The range of biomaterials in 3D paste printing is still fairly limited, since pastes pose unique challenges: their structure must not collapse during printing and the objects manufactured must remain sufficiently strong, rigid or flexible after drying. In 3D biomaterial filaments, however, commercial products already exist. Continue reading “VTT Finland is developing 3D technology for wound care”

Research Proves Superiority of 3D Bioprinted Human Liver Tissues in Assessing Drug-Induced Toxicity

Organovo Holdings, Inc., a three-dimensional biology company focused on delivering scientific and medical breakthroughs using its 3D bioprinting technology, today announced a publication in the scientific journal, PLOS One, which demonstrates the superiority of Organovo’s 3D bioprinted human liver tissues to effectively model drug-induced liver injury and distinguish between highly-related compounds with different toxicity profiles.  Continue reading “Research Proves Superiority of 3D Bioprinted Human Liver Tissues in Assessing Drug-Induced Toxicity”

3D printed silk ‘micro-rockets’ could deliver medicines through your body (Video)

3D printed silk ‘micro-rockets’ could deliver medicines through your body

Sheffield engineers make major breakthrough in developing silk ‘micro-rockets’ that can be used safely in biological environments.

By using an innovative 3D inkjet printing method, researchers from Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Sheffield have taken the biggest step yet in producing microscopic silk swimming devices that are biodegradable and harmless to a biological system. Continue reading “3D printed silk ‘micro-rockets’ could deliver medicines through your body (Video)”

Researchers reveal process of 3-dimensional printing oral tablets by stereolithography

3-dimensional printing (3DP) of medicines is becoming an increasingly popular trend, especially since the first 3D printed medicine (Spritam®) was approved by the FDA in August 2015.

Researchers from University College London – School of Pharmacy and FabRx Ltd. have recently published a paper in International Journal of Pharmaceutics in which they show, for the first time, the fabrication of oral tablets by stereolithography. Continue reading “Researchers reveal process of 3-dimensional printing oral tablets by stereolithography”

First FDA-Approved 3D Printed Medicine Becomes Available

Aprecia Pharmaceuticals announced that SPRITAM® (levetiracetam) tablets, for oral suspension, is now available as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial onset seizures, myoclonic seizures and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

SPRITAM is the first prescription drug product approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that is manufactured using 3D printing technology. Continue reading “First FDA-Approved 3D Printed Medicine Becomes Available”

“The regulatory perspective: benefits and limits of 3D printed drugs” – Presented by Dr. William Shang, Johnson & Johnson

Dr. William Shang

“The regulatory perspective: benefits and limits of 3D printed drugs” – Presented by Dr. William Shang, Johnson & Johnson. 3DP technology is already up and running in many areas. The future definitely looks promising when considering the idea of 3DPs, but are the regulatory agencies ready for such technology? The presentation will reflect the regulators views and concerns about pharmaceutical development, manufacturing and control of this new technology. Potential clinical and preclinical obstacles in terms of practical use will be addressed as well.

About Dr. William Shang Continue reading ““The regulatory perspective: benefits and limits of 3D printed drugs” – Presented by Dr. William Shang, Johnson & Johnson”

“Legal Issues around 3D Printed Drugs” – Presented by An Vijverman, Dewallens & Partners Law Firm

“Legal Issues around 3D Printed Drugs” – Presented by Ann Vijverman, Dewallens & Partners Law Firm.In this presentation it will be analyzed whether and how 3D printed Drugs could fit within the actual legal framework concerning medicinal products: can the 3D printed drug qualify as an industrially prepared medicinal product; or as a magistral or officinal formula; or as an ATMP; or as a bona fida unsolicited order; or …? And what about the applicable GMP requirements? And how will 3D drug printing comply with the applicable data protection legislation? Continue reading ““Legal Issues around 3D Printed Drugs” – Presented by An Vijverman, Dewallens & Partners Law Firm”

3D printing a functional polypill: a practical manufacturing method?”, Presented by Clive Roberts, University of Nottingham

3D printing a functional polypill: a practical manufacturing method?”, Presented by Clive Roberts, University of Nottingham. The processes used to produce tablets, the dominant form of medicine taken by patients, have changed relatively little for over a century. Whilst these approaches serve the industry and patients very well they remain limited and cannot create complex dosage forms or bespoke medications tailored for an individual or sub-population. This would be valuable in meeting therapeutic challenges and the need for personalized medicines. 3D printing, offers a route to address these issues. As an example I will show amongst other examples, a 3DP 5-drug polypill. The potential and challenges for using 3DP in the manufacture of medicines will be discussed. Continue reading “3D printing a functional polypill: a practical manufacturing method?”, Presented by Clive Roberts, University of Nottingham”

3D printing of medicines could lead to problems with identifying the patented drug product, attorneys warn

drug

The FDA’s approval of the first 3D-printed drug could lead to complicated product liability and intellectual property issues, attorneys told Bloomberg BNA recently.

The 3D printing of drugs products could lead to problems with identifying the patented drug product and with identifying who is considered the manufacturer for product liability purposes, the attorneys said. Continue reading “3D printing of medicines could lead to problems with identifying the patented drug product, attorneys warn”