“Tailored made degradable synthetic polymers for 3D (bio)printing” – Presented by Christian Grandfils, CEIB, University of Liège

Advances in 3D (bio)printing need to have tailored made degradable polymers adapted to build structures mimicking our living structures.

PolyLife, a first spin-off project supported by Wallonia region, and BioMiMedics, an Interreg Meuse-Rhin project, have given us the financial tools to build a reactive extrusion platform allowing to synthesize and process degradable biocompatible polyesters in one single and continuous step. The process is rapid (minute scale), green and the equipment is GMP compliant. Continue reading ““Tailored made degradable synthetic polymers for 3D (bio)printing” – Presented by Christian Grandfils, CEIB, University of Liège”

“Adding biomolecular recognition capability to 3D printed objects: 4D printing” – Presented by Céline A. Mandon, 3d.FAB – Université Lyon 1

Adding biomolecular recognition capability to 3D printed objects: 4D printing – Presented by Céline A. Mandon, 3d.FAB – Université Lyon 1. The availability of new printing technologies and materials, in additive manufacturing processes and more specifically 3D printing, initiate profound mutation of biotechnology engineers’ way of thinking. Our group have been working on this new paradigm for the last 2 years, digging deeply into the 3D printing technologies and ink formulation to achieve complex 3D objects, composed of printed living cells evolving into human tissues or photopolymers bearing biomolecules. These 4D printed objects, by the access to unprecedented sensing layer complex geometries, generate biological diagnostic devices such as immunosensors but also enzymatically active 3D objects for biosensing and catalysis.

Continue reading ““Adding biomolecular recognition capability to 3D printed objects: 4D printing” – Presented by Céline A. Mandon, 3d.FAB – Université Lyon 1″

Léa Pourchet, Université de Lyon, Presents: “Skin equivalent through bioprinting”

The main goal of this work was to print living cells with an open-source printer, part of the new logic of personalized regenerative medicine.

The presented study provides skin equivalent 3D printing proof of concept with strong indicators such as viable cells integration and generation of a 3D network of neo-secretion ECM (Extra-Cellular Matrix), making the printed skin equivalents as close as possible to the real human skin. Continue reading “Léa Pourchet, Université de Lyon, Presents: “Skin equivalent through bioprinting””

“REGEMAT 3D bioprinting for cartilage regeneration and much more”, Presented by Jose Manuel Baena, REGEMAT 3D

Tissue regeneration (TR) is currently one of the most challenging biotechnology unsolved problems. Tissue engineering (TE) is a multidisciplinary science that aims at solving the problems of TR. TE could solve pathologies and improve the quality of life of billions of people around the world suffering from tissue damages.

New advances in stem cell (SC) research for the regeneration of tissue injuries have opened a new promising research field. However, research carried out nowadays with two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not provide the expected results, as 2D cultures do not mimic the 3D structure of a living tissue. Continue reading ““REGEMAT 3D bioprinting for cartilage regeneration and much more”, Presented by Jose Manuel Baena, REGEMAT 3D”

“Patient Specific Implants – Success Cases” – Presented by José Manuel Baena Martinez, BRECA Health Care

In order to reach the best possible outcomes, patient’s individualities should be taken into account, off-the shelf solutions are therefore limited in this particularity. The solution is patient-specific implants that perfectly fit the patient’s anatomy and guarantee optimum results. Continue reading ““Patient Specific Implants – Success Cases” – Presented by José Manuel Baena Martinez, BRECA Health Care”

Marcy Zenobi-Wong, ETH Zürich, Presents: “BioPrinting Cartilage”

Bioprinting is an emerging technology for the fabrication of patient-specific, anatomically-complex cartilage organs. Bioinks based on regulatory-compliant polysaccharides are being developed which undergoes cell friendly gelation and yield a strong, ductile material. To make bioinks more tissue-specific and bioactive, micronized extracellular matrix particles can be added. As examples, 3D auricular, nasal, meniscal and vertebral disc grafts based on computer tomography (CT) data or generic 3D models are shown. The bioink supports proliferation and deposition of matrix proteins. This versatile bioprinting method can produce patient-specific cartilage grafts with good mechanical and biological properties. Continue reading “Marcy Zenobi-Wong, ETH Zürich, Presents: “BioPrinting Cartilage””

Chris Arts, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Will Speak at the 3D Medtech Printing Conference

Dr Chris Arts, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Will Speak about “High resolution imaging to study implant material and host tissue interaction of 3-D printed medical devices” at the 3D Medtech Printing Conference.

With the emergence of 3-D printed implants in the field of orthopaedic surgery it is most important to assess safety and efficacy in clinical patients. Furthermore these imaging techniques enable early screening of patients at risk for treatment failure . In this presentation several imaging techniques for this purpose such as MRI, HRpQCT and 18F-Fluoride PET-CT will be discussed. Continue reading “Chris Arts, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Will Speak at the 3D Medtech Printing Conference”

“Biofabrication: Print your heart out” – Presented by Dirk-Jan Cornelissen, Heriot-Watt University

New drugs can take more than 10 years to develop, and only around 16% of drug candidates that begin pre-clinical testing are approved for human use. This low success rate is partially due to the different responses of humans and the animal models currently used for testing. A key challenge in bioprinting has been the development of more gentle printing processes to preserve cellular functions. By encapsulating cells inside a gel, complex 3D structures can be printed with cells suspended throughout. Continue reading ““Biofabrication: Print your heart out” – Presented by Dirk-Jan Cornelissen, Heriot-Watt University”