Translational Challenges in 3D-Bioprinting

By Prasad Shastri, Professor of Biofunctional Macromolecular Chemistry & Bioss Professor of Cell Signalling Environments / Director, Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry at University of Freiburg

3D-Bioprinting holds much promise in advancing medicine as tool to replicate cellular complexity of tissue environment ex vivo for drug screening and as a means of engineering well-defined functional tissue units for transplantation. In regards to the latter, 3D-bioprinting offers a critical link between principles of tissue engineering and patient-specific delivery of healthcare.

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Student demo corner: 3D Bioprinting as a promising tool for retinal regeneration

Beatrice Belgio

Beatrice Belgio, PhD Student, Politecnico di Milano, will demo her project at 3D Medical Conference & Expo

Currently there are no retinal tissue engineered grafts for clinical applications. Our project aims at designing a functional retinal tissue that could be implanted in patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration.

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Using digital twins to design 3D printed implants for skeletal tissue engineering

Liesbet Geris

by Liesbet Geris, University of Liege

One of the major challenges in tissue engineering and an essential step towards successful clinical applications is the translation of biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into predictive and robust engineering processes. Computational modelling can contribute to this, among others because it allows to study the biological complexity in a more quantitative way. Computational tools can help in quantifying and optimizing micro-environmental signals to which cells and tissues are exposed and in understanding and predicting the biological response under different conditions.

A wide variety of model systems has been presented in the context of tissue engineering ranging from empirical models (data-driven) over gene network models to mechanistic models (hypothesis-based), targeting processes at the intracellular over the cellular up to the tissue level. Each model system has its own benefits and limitations which delineate the context in which it can be used. Whereas mechanistic models are used as in silico tools to design new therapeutic strategies and experiments, empirical models are used to identify, in large data sets, those in vitro parameters (biological, biomaterial, environmental) that are critical for the in vivo outcome.

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Beyond bioprinting: on the eve of major changes in biotechnology and modern medicine

Pawel Slusarczyk

by Pawel Slusarczyk, President of the Board, CD3D Sp. z o.o.

  1. Introduction: short history of CD3D and The Open Bioprinting Cluster
  2. The historical approach: the development of the 3D printing industry and perspectives for the development of the bioprinting market
  3. Three pillars of technology development: the meaning of hardware, materials and software for creation of new kind of medical applications

Program: https://3dmedicalconference.com/program/

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3D Bioprinting: use of Polycaprolactone in clinical and research biomedical applications

Andrea Del Fattore

duo presentation by

Andrea Del Fattore, Head of the Bone Physiopathology Group, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Rome, Italy

& Luca Borro, 3D Specialist, 3D Biomedica Advanced Modeling and Printing Technician, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Rome, Italy

Bioprinting is a technology that could revolutionize the biomedical field. It has already been used to engineer constructs that mimic aspects of the anatomical and structural complexity, allowing the production of perfectly functional and “biologically active” patient-specific parts.

One of the most important challenges of bioprinting is the identification of biomaterials that have adequate biocompatibility and biodegradability features to be used in clinical use in humans.

In this session we will describe some applications of 3D Bioprinting of Polycaprolactone in clinical applications and in research contexts.

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3D Bioprinting: use of Polycaprolactone in clinical and research biomedical applications

Luca Borro

duo presentation by

Luca Borro, 3D Specialist, 3D Biomedica Advanced Modeling and Printing Technician, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Rome, Italy

& Andrea Del Fattore, Head of the Bone Physiopathology Group, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Rome, Italy

Bioprinting is a technology that could revolutionize the biomedical field. It has already been used to engineer constructs that mimic aspects of the anatomical and structural complexity, allowing the production of perfectly functional and “biologically active” patient-specific parts.

One of the most important challenges of bioprinting is the identification of biomaterials that have adequate biocompatibility and biodegradability features to be used in clinical use in humans.

Continue reading “3D Bioprinting: use of Polycaprolactone in clinical and research biomedical applications”

BioInks the Lynchpin of 3D Bioprinting: Challenges and Opportunities – Presented by Prasad Shastri, University of Freiburg

Prasad Shastri

BioInks the Lynchpin of 3D Bioprinting: Challenges and Opportunities – Presented by Prasad Shastri, University of Freiburg, at the 3D Medical Conference, which takes place on January 30-31, 2019, at MECC Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Success begets success. This adage is highly relevant for the field of 3D bioprinting today. While the 3D bioprinting as a field has seen explosive growth in the past 5 years, with impressive developments in hardware, the absence of notable translational successes is a clear area of concern. Just as the development of affordable inks drove the adoption of color printers in every household, bioinks are expected to be the lynchpin of 3D bioprinting.

Currently, the bioink segment is largely dominated by methacrylated gelatin (GelMa), alginate and combinations thereof. While these biomaterials are adequate for bioprinting in the laboratory, their translational potential is limited. Continue reading “BioInks the Lynchpin of 3D Bioprinting: Challenges and Opportunities – Presented by Prasad Shastri, University of Freiburg”

Is developing 3D bioink for all cell types & all printing techniques achievable?

3D bioink

Is developing 3D bioink for all cell types & all printing techniques achievable?

The concept of developing a bioink that can be used for all cell types and all printing techniques is at best unrealistic and at worst impossible.  What is much more achievable and also more desirable is a modifiable, modular system. A base material in which mechanical properties can be easily adapted for the chosen additive method and then formulated for each specific cell type or multiple cell types involved in the end application. Continue reading “Is developing 3D bioink for all cell types & all printing techniques achievable?”