Future of 3D medicine printing: One pill shall rule them all

Future of 3D medicine printing: One pill shall rule them all

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have found a way to make personalised medicine cheaper and easier. Imagine if you could combine the myriad of pills you need to take for your ailment in just one tablet; or if you need only to take the medication once a day and the drug will be slowly released throughout the day at different rates to treat your illness; or if doctors could easily make tablets on the spot that are tailored to each patient’s needs.

All these could become a reality with a new method of tablet fabrication designed by Assistant Professor Soh Siow Ling and PhD student Ms. Sun Yajuan from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering. The novel system can make customisable pills that release drugs with any desired release profiles. Continue reading “Future of 3D medicine printing: One pill shall rule them all”

Researchers reveal process of 3-dimensional printing oral tablets by stereolithography

3-dimensional printing (3DP) of medicines is becoming an increasingly popular trend, especially since the first 3D printed medicine (Spritam®) was approved by the FDA in August 2015.

Researchers from University College London – School of Pharmacy and FabRx Ltd. have recently published a paper in International Journal of Pharmaceutics in which they show, for the first time, the fabrication of oral tablets by stereolithography. Continue reading “Researchers reveal process of 3-dimensional printing oral tablets by stereolithography”

“Printing technologies in fabrication of drug delivery systems” – Presented by Niklas Sandler, Åbo Akademi University

Different types of printing methods have attracted interest as emerging technologies for fabrication of drug delivery systems (DDS). Recent examples include the use of diverse types of inkjet (IJ) printers for depositing drug-loaded inks to produce accurately and precisely dosed units of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs The concepts include on the simplest level accurately deposited doses of drug substances and one-layer films. On the other hand, printing technologies allow the manufacture of advanced multi-layer membranes, various type of stacked systems, and integrated multi-compartment systems with bioactive components. This talk will present examples on the use of printing technologies that are of potential interest in printing technologies in personalization of drug products. Continue reading ““Printing technologies in fabrication of drug delivery systems” – Presented by Niklas Sandler, Åbo Akademi University”

3D printing of medicines could lead to problems with identifying the patented drug product, attorneys warn

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The FDA’s approval of the first 3D-printed drug could lead to complicated product liability and intellectual property issues, attorneys told Bloomberg BNA recently.

The 3D printing of drugs products could lead to problems with identifying the patented drug product and with identifying who is considered the manufacturer for product liability purposes, the attorneys said. Continue reading “3D printing of medicines could lead to problems with identifying the patented drug product, attorneys warn”

Personalized medications can be produced with high precision through 3D printing

Personalized medications based on a patient’s medical and biological profiles can be produced with high precision through 3D printing, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

Traditional pre-formulated medicines have not allowed for customization that accounts for a patient’s weight, race, and kidney and liver functions. However, adjusting for these factors could be a new way of increasing effectiveness and reducing side effects, researchers explained. Continue reading “Personalized medications can be produced with high precision through 3D printing”

3D Printing Ushers in New Era for the Pharmaceutical Industry

3D Printing Ushers in New Era for the Pharmaceutical Industry. Three-dimensional (3D)-printing technology is on track to change the way we make things and drug manufacturing is no exception. After more than two decades of research on the application of 3D printers in drug manufacturing, the FDA has approved for the very first time a drug formulation produced using 3D-printing technology. The approved drug, Spritam (levetiracetam), is a prescription medicine used as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of seizures in adults and children with epilepsy. Continue reading “3D Printing Ushers in New Era for the Pharmaceutical Industry”

Pharma Interest in 3D Printing

Pharma Interest in 3D Printing.The notion of tailor-made drugs, which are customised to an individual patient’s needs, has seen remarkable progress of late. This has culminated in the achievement of recent ground-breaking pharma innovation in the area of technology known as three dimensional (3D) printing.

The progression within the industry in the potential use of this technology is obvious, with the recent announcement of the first 3D printed drug in the world to gain approval from a regulator, in this case the FDA’s green light for Aprecia’s Spritam (levetiracetam). Although 3D printing has already been incorporated in other medical fields such as prosthetics, it is the first time technology of this kind has been adopted and approved for the production of drugs for human use. Continue reading “Pharma Interest in 3D Printing”

Researchers Create Microneedle Arrays for Transdermal Drug Delivery

Researchers Create Microneedle Arrays for Transdermal Drug Delivery.Drug-loaded microneedle arrays for transdermal delivery of a chemotherapeutic drug were fabricated using multi-material microstereolithography (μSL). These arrays consisted of twenty-five poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) microneedles, which were precisely orientated on the same polymeric substrate. To control the viscosity and improve the mechanical properties of the PPF, diethyl fumarate (DEF) was mixed with the polymer. Dacarbazine, which is widely used for skin cancer, was uniformly blended into the PPF/DEF solution prior to crosslinking. Each microneedle has a cylindrical base with a height of 700 μm and a conical tip with a height of 300 μm. Continue reading “Researchers Create Microneedle Arrays for Transdermal Drug Delivery”

How Does 3D Medicine Work?

How Does 3D Medicine Work?The pharmaceuticals industry turned over a new leaf earlier this month when the US Food and Drug Administration gave the go-ahead for production of a 3D-printed pill. The step marked the emergence of ‘3D medicine,’ a new term that will categorically shape the future of pharmaceuticals. Intrigued? You’re not alone. The approval made global headlines however not everyone is 100% clear on what 3D medicine means, and how it will impact the pharmaceuticals industry as we know it. Here’s our explanation: Continue reading “How Does 3D Medicine Work?”