Prosperos: Lessons learned for 3D printed implants

Raymond Bevers

by Raymond Bevers, Maastricht University

Prosperos is a 4 year, 4.5M€ project, focussed on developing the next generation of 3D printed implants. The project is funded by the Interreg V Flanders – the Netherlands program. A lot was learned about the technology, the application, and hurdles towards introduction of these implants into the clinic. During this presentation we would like to share the (preliminary) results and the most important lessons learned.

program: https://3dmedicalconference.com/program/

Continue reading “Prosperos: Lessons learned for 3D printed implants”

How are 3D printing & digital technology changing dentistry?

dentistry

3D printing & digital technology have been gaining grounds in the dental practice in the recent years. Additive technologies, such as DLP are widely used to build, starting from digital files, dental models in addition to orthodontic and prosthetic devices. 3D printed patient specific implants are used more and more in clinical cases. The start-up Lake3D wants to develop the first 3D Dental printer based on Multi Material 3D inkjet.

Continue reading “How are 3D printing & digital technology changing dentistry?”

Application of 3D printed patient specific implant in oral and maxillofacial reconstructive surgery

Yi Sun

by Yi Sun, Head of 3D surgical planning Lab, UZ Leuven

3D printed patient specific implants are used more and more in clinical cases. This presentation covers the general clinical applications of 3D printed titanium implants, the design workflow and the clinical and engineering challenges. The further research work of 3D printed scaffold in bone regeneration will be introduced.

program: https://3dmedicalconference.com/program/

Continue reading “Application of 3D printed patient specific implant in oral and maxillofacial reconstructive surgery”

Using digital twins to design 3D printed implants for skeletal tissue engineering

Liesbet Geris

by Liesbet Geris, University of Liege

One of the major challenges in tissue engineering and an essential step towards successful clinical applications is the translation of biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into predictive and robust engineering processes. Computational modelling can contribute to this, among others because it allows to study the biological complexity in a more quantitative way. Computational tools can help in quantifying and optimizing micro-environmental signals to which cells and tissues are exposed and in understanding and predicting the biological response under different conditions.

A wide variety of model systems has been presented in the context of tissue engineering ranging from empirical models (data-driven) over gene network models to mechanistic models (hypothesis-based), targeting processes at the intracellular over the cellular up to the tissue level. Each model system has its own benefits and limitations which delineate the context in which it can be used. Whereas mechanistic models are used as in silico tools to design new therapeutic strategies and experiments, empirical models are used to identify, in large data sets, those in vitro parameters (biological, biomaterial, environmental) that are critical for the in vivo outcome.

Continue reading “Using digital twins to design 3D printed implants for skeletal tissue engineering”

Need a new skull or mandible? 3d print it! – Presented by Jules Poukens, University Hasselt & Leuven

Jules Poukens

Need a new skull or mandible? 3d print it! – Presented by Jules Poukens, Cranio-maxillofacial Surgeon, Zuyderland Medical Center / The Netherlands, Lecturer-Researcher, University Hasselt and Leuven, Belgium, at the 3D Medical Conference 2019.

Patients in the cranio-maxillofacial clinic often present with serious, complex, and potentially life- threatening or life-limiting medical conditions (e.g. tumor, trauma, aggressive osteomyelitis). Available treatments may not always give satisfactory results for patients and doctors. Therefore, complex problems ask for new solutions.

An emerging technique in the medical field is Computer Aided Design (CAD) , Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) by 3D printing. For successful implementation of CAD-CAM technology in the clinical practice doctors, dentists and engineers need to work together and share their expertise.

This intense cooperation leads to 3D printing of custom patient specific implants. 3D printed implants are used for the treatment of skull defects, temporo-mandibular joint replacement and world’s first 3D printed entire mandible replacement implant.

Clinical cases will be highlighted. Continue reading “Need a new skull or mandible? 3d print it! – Presented by Jules Poukens, University Hasselt & Leuven”