Using digital twins to design 3D printed implants for skeletal tissue engineering

Liesbet Geris

by Liesbet Geris, University of Liege

One of the major challenges in tissue engineering and an essential step towards successful clinical applications is the translation of biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into predictive and robust engineering processes. Computational modelling can contribute to this, among others because it allows to study the biological complexity in a more quantitative way. Computational tools can help in quantifying and optimizing micro-environmental signals to which cells and tissues are exposed and in understanding and predicting the biological response under different conditions.

A wide variety of model systems has been presented in the context of tissue engineering ranging from empirical models (data-driven) over gene network models to mechanistic models (hypothesis-based), targeting processes at the intracellular over the cellular up to the tissue level. Each model system has its own benefits and limitations which delineate the context in which it can be used. Whereas mechanistic models are used as in silico tools to design new therapeutic strategies and experiments, empirical models are used to identify, in large data sets, those in vitro parameters (biological, biomaterial, environmental) that are critical for the in vivo outcome.

Continue reading “Using digital twins to design 3D printed implants for skeletal tissue engineering”

BioInks the Lynchpin of 3D Bioprinting: Challenges and Opportunities – Presented by Prasad Shastri, University of Freiburg

Prasad Shastri

BioInks the Lynchpin of 3D Bioprinting: Challenges and Opportunities – Presented by Prasad Shastri, University of Freiburg, at the 3D Medical Conference, which takes place on January 30-31, 2019, at MECC Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Success begets success. This adage is highly relevant for the field of 3D bioprinting today. While the 3D bioprinting as a field has seen explosive growth in the past 5 years, with impressive developments in hardware, the absence of notable translational successes is a clear area of concern. Just as the development of affordable inks drove the adoption of color printers in every household, bioinks are expected to be the lynchpin of 3D bioprinting.

Currently, the bioink segment is largely dominated by methacrylated gelatin (GelMa), alginate and combinations thereof. While these biomaterials are adequate for bioprinting in the laboratory, their translational potential is limited. Continue reading “BioInks the Lynchpin of 3D Bioprinting: Challenges and Opportunities – Presented by Prasad Shastri, University of Freiburg”

Bioprinting of tissues and organs – Presented by Carlos Mota, Maastricht University

carlos mota

Bioprinting of tissues and organs – Presented by Carlos Mota, Maastricht University, at the 3D Medical Conference, which takes place on January 30-31, 2019, at MECC Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Bioprinting technologies are a group of computer-driven systems used to manufacture three-dimensional (3D) tissue and organ-like constructs. These 3D structures are normally manufactured with bioinks where the combination of specific cells and biomaterials is tuned according to the aimed tissue or organ.

At the MERLN institute, we are using different bioprinting techniques, namely extrusion, droplet-on-demand and microfluidics to develop tissue implants and organ models. Some examples of the tissue implants already developed are constructs for long bone defects and cardiac patch. For the long bone implant, novel alginate-based bioinks have been developed and combined with human periosteum-derived cells. Continue reading “Bioprinting of tissues and organs – Presented by Carlos Mota, Maastricht University”

Next generation hydrogels for 3D tissue engineering: From simple bioinks to complex ECM mimics – Presented by Matthew Baker, MERLN Institute

Matthew Baker

Next generation hydrogels for 3D tissue engineering: From simple bioinks to complex ECM mimics – Presented by Matthew Baker, MERLN Institute

The use of hydrogels as a 3D environment for tissue engineering and as a soft biomaterial scaffold remains one of the most promising and successful material classes, with a long history of development. However, our tool-box for materials remains surprisingly limited, especially when considering the need for customizability. Our lab attacks this problem from two fronts: 1) We use simple, straightforward, and reliable chemical functionalization to create user-friendly “bioinks” for 3D printing of soft tissue constructs, and 2) We create bioinspired hydrogels, based on supramolecular self-assembly, that more closely recapitulate the dynamic nature, structure, and function of the native extracellular matrix (ECM). We ultimately aim to create straightforward and reliable hydrogels, which are robust enough to allow for biofabrication, while being dynamic enough to recapitulate the native cellular environment. Continue reading “Next generation hydrogels for 3D tissue engineering: From simple bioinks to complex ECM mimics – Presented by Matthew Baker, MERLN Institute”

Partnership for bio-printing of hair, signed by Poietis and L’Oreal

bio-printing

Partnership for bio-printing of hair, signed by Poietis and L’Oreal. L’Oreal has been committed to tissue engineering for almost 30 years and holds unique knowledge and expertise in the field of bio-printing of hair. With this exclusive research partnership, L’Oreal and Poietis are giving themselves the means to pursue a new scientific challenge: bio-printing a hair follicle, the small organ that produces hair, using a bio-printer. Continue reading “Partnership for bio-printing of hair, signed by Poietis and L’Oreal”

Cutting-edge 3D printing techniques have been leveraged in the biomedical engineering field using bioinks

THREE-dimensional (3D) printing continues to drive innovations in many disciplines, including engineering, manufacturing, aerospace, global security, and medicine, to name only a few. Most 3D products are made of plastics or metals, but cutting-edge 3D printing techniques have been leveraged in the biomedical engineering field using bioinks—a fluid with biological components—to manufacture vascularized tissue. Once refined, this approach could be used to engineer complete human organs for implantation and to assess medical treatments. Continue reading “Cutting-edge 3D printing techniques have been leveraged in the biomedical engineering field using bioinks”

First Living Cellular Bioink Kits to Be Made Commercially Available

Sometimes it is difficult to tell the difference between news about advances in medicine and the plot for a B movie horror film. The latest developments related to bioprinting are just that kind of material and yet they are part of what is actually happening as medicine and 3D printing technology continue to work together. Just this week, CELLINK and RoosterBio have announced a partnership that allows them to pool their complementary technologies and make Cellular Bioink Kits commercially available. Continue reading “First Living Cellular Bioink Kits to Be Made Commercially Available”