New biomaterials

Andrea Alice Konta

Andrea Alice Konta, Doctoral Researcher, University of Nottingham, will demo her project at 3D Medical Conference & Expo

The aim of the project is to produce new biomaterials in order to expand the library of materials available for two photon polymerisation – a 3D printing technique that allows printing complex structures at the micro and nanoscales – and then use them to manufacture a biomedical device capable of sustained drug release for wet – Age Related Macular Degeneration.

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Using digital twins to design 3D printed implants for skeletal tissue engineering

Liesbet Geris

by Liesbet Geris, University of Liege

One of the major challenges in tissue engineering and an essential step towards successful clinical applications is the translation of biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into predictive and robust engineering processes. Computational modelling can contribute to this, among others because it allows to study the biological complexity in a more quantitative way. Computational tools can help in quantifying and optimizing micro-environmental signals to which cells and tissues are exposed and in understanding and predicting the biological response under different conditions.

A wide variety of model systems has been presented in the context of tissue engineering ranging from empirical models (data-driven) over gene network models to mechanistic models (hypothesis-based), targeting processes at the intracellular over the cellular up to the tissue level. Each model system has its own benefits and limitations which delineate the context in which it can be used. Whereas mechanistic models are used as in silico tools to design new therapeutic strategies and experiments, empirical models are used to identify, in large data sets, those in vitro parameters (biological, biomaterial, environmental) that are critical for the in vivo outcome.

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3D-printing of photo-crosslinkable polymers for tissue engineering purposes

Sandra Van Vlierberghe

by Sandra Van Vlierberghe, Professor (BOF-ZAP), Ghent University

Biofabrication is a specific area within the field of tissue engineering which takes advantage of rapid manufacturing (RM) techniques to generate 3D structures which mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). A popular material in this respect is gelatin, as it is a cost-effective collagen derivative, which is the major constituent of the natural ECM. The material is characterized by an upper critical solution temperature making the material soluble at physiological conditions. To tackle this problem, the present work focusses on different gelatin functionalization strategies which enable covalent stabilization of 3D gelatin structures [1, 2].

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Comparing different direct metal printed resorbable medical implants – Presented by Holger Jahr, Univ. Hospital RWTH Aachen

Holger Jahr

Comparing different direct metal printed resorbable medical implants – Presented by Holger Jahr, Univ. Hospital RWTH Aachen, at the 3D Medical Conference, which takes place on January 30-31, 2019, at MECC Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Bone repair biomaterials should possess bone-mimicking fully interconnected porous structures of relevant mechanical properties. Ideally, this is combined with an appropriate biodegradation behavior to enable full regeneration and subsequent biological remodeling. Recent advances in additive manufacturing resulted in biomaterials satisfying the former two requirements, while simultaneously satisfying the latter requirement remains challenging. Continue reading “Comparing different direct metal printed resorbable medical implants – Presented by Holger Jahr, Univ. Hospital RWTH Aachen”

Next generation hydrogels for 3D tissue engineering: From simple bioinks to complex ECM mimics – Presented by Matthew Baker, MERLN Institute

Matthew Baker

Next generation hydrogels for 3D tissue engineering: From simple bioinks to complex ECM mimics – Presented by Matthew Baker, MERLN Institute

The use of hydrogels as a 3D environment for tissue engineering and as a soft biomaterial scaffold remains one of the most promising and successful material classes, with a long history of development. However, our tool-box for materials remains surprisingly limited, especially when considering the need for customizability. Our lab attacks this problem from two fronts: 1) We use simple, straightforward, and reliable chemical functionalization to create user-friendly “bioinks” for 3D printing of soft tissue constructs, and 2) We create bioinspired hydrogels, based on supramolecular self-assembly, that more closely recapitulate the dynamic nature, structure, and function of the native extracellular matrix (ECM). We ultimately aim to create straightforward and reliable hydrogels, which are robust enough to allow for biofabrication, while being dynamic enough to recapitulate the native cellular environment. Continue reading “Next generation hydrogels for 3D tissue engineering: From simple bioinks to complex ECM mimics – Presented by Matthew Baker, MERLN Institute”

Regenerative dental fillings could help heal your teeth

Researchers from the University of Nottingham and the Wyss Institute at Harvard University have developed therapeutic synthetic, light-curable, biomaterials for dental treatments that support native dental stem cells inside teeth to repair and regenerate dentin.

The approach could significantly impact millions of dental patients each year by dental fillings that help heal teeth when they are injured from dental disease or dental surgery. Continue reading “Regenerative dental fillings could help heal your teeth”

Carnegie Mellon Researchers Try to Rebuild Hearts Using Biomaterials Printed with Inexpensive Printers (Video)

As of this month, over 4,000 Americans are on the waiting list to receive a heart transplant. With failing hearts, these patients have no other options; heart tissue, unlike other parts of the body, is unable to heal itself once it is damaged. Fortunately, recent work by a group at Carnegie Mellon could one day lead to a world in which transplants are no longer necessary to repair damaged organs. Continue reading “Carnegie Mellon Researchers Try to Rebuild Hearts Using Biomaterials Printed with Inexpensive Printers (Video)”