Production of hydrogels based on modified-silk fibroin

sofia santi

Sofia Santi, Università degli Studi di Trento will demo her project at 3D Medical Conference & Expo

Production of hydrogels based on modified-silk fibroin. Evaluation of the reaction efficiencies involved and mechanical properties in order to create an implantable system with defined parameters.

Have a look at all the (PhD)students who are demonstrating their projects during the conference / expo, click here.

More information about the Student Demo Corner: https://3dmedicalconference.com/student-demo-corner/

3D-printing of photo-crosslinkable polymers for tissue engineering purposes

Sandra Van Vlierberghe

by Sandra Van Vlierberghe, Professor (BOF-ZAP), Ghent University

Biofabrication is a specific area within the field of tissue engineering which takes advantage of rapid manufacturing (RM) techniques to generate 3D structures which mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). A popular material in this respect is gelatin, as it is a cost-effective collagen derivative, which is the major constituent of the natural ECM. The material is characterized by an upper critical solution temperature making the material soluble at physiological conditions. To tackle this problem, the present work focusses on different gelatin functionalization strategies which enable covalent stabilization of 3D gelatin structures [1, 2].

Continue reading “3D-printing of photo-crosslinkable polymers for tissue engineering purposes”

Next generation hydrogels for 3D tissue engineering: From simple bioinks to complex ECM mimics – Presented by Matthew Baker, MERLN Institute

Matthew Baker

Next generation hydrogels for 3D tissue engineering: From simple bioinks to complex ECM mimics – Presented by Matthew Baker, MERLN Institute

The use of hydrogels as a 3D environment for tissue engineering and as a soft biomaterial scaffold remains one of the most promising and successful material classes, with a long history of development. However, our tool-box for materials remains surprisingly limited, especially when considering the need for customizability. Our lab attacks this problem from two fronts: 1) We use simple, straightforward, and reliable chemical functionalization to create user-friendly “bioinks” for 3D printing of soft tissue constructs, and 2) We create bioinspired hydrogels, based on supramolecular self-assembly, that more closely recapitulate the dynamic nature, structure, and function of the native extracellular matrix (ECM). We ultimately aim to create straightforward and reliable hydrogels, which are robust enough to allow for biofabrication, while being dynamic enough to recapitulate the native cellular environment. Continue reading “Next generation hydrogels for 3D tissue engineering: From simple bioinks to complex ECM mimics – Presented by Matthew Baker, MERLN Institute”

New 3D Printable Hydrogel Composites Created — Possible Breakthrough in Human Body Part Replacement

There is tremendous progress being made within the area of 3D bioprinting. In fact, there are companies working to print human organs as we speak, and within the next decade such organs may, if we are lucky, be available for human transplantation. With that said we still are a ways away from such an accomplishment. Continue reading “New 3D Printable Hydrogel Composites Created — Possible Breakthrough in Human Body Part Replacement”