AstroPrint, NIH 3D Print Exchange partner up for bioscientific research

We’ve seen some truly phenomenal applications of 3D printing in the healthcare arena, where 3D printed medical models have shortened times in the operating room, enhanced efficiency and precision in procedures and in training, and directly saved lives and even a spleen and a kidney. There’s no denying at this point that 3D printing certainly has a place in hospitals, from explaining procedures to patients to training surgeons to playing a direct role in complex operations in creating both models and implants. In order to broaden the availability of this application, wider adaptation and accessibility must occur–and a new collaboration between AstroPrint and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will do just that.

3D model of a stroke from 3DPrintforHealth: There are 3 total STL files: the first is of the vessels in the brain; the second is of the hollow skull; the third is a filling so that encases the vessels, allowing them to be printed without the need for support material.

Together, AstroPrint–a 3D printing startup based in San Diego that got its start on Kickstarter and also partners with entities such as Airwolf 3D, 3D Hubs, and CGTrader–and the NIH are working to make medical models not only accessible, but incredibly simple to create via 3D printing.Read more

Source: 3dprint.com

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