High resolution biomaterial printing via low-voltage electrospinning patterning – Presented by Yan Yan Shery Huang, University of Cambridge

High resolution biomaterial printing via low-voltage electrospinning patterning – Presented by Yan Yan Shery Huang, University of Cambridge at the 3D Bioprinting Conference which takes place on Jan 31, 2017 at MECC Maastricht in The Netherlands.

The creation of more complex tissue scaffolds points to the need for controlled assembly of artificial and biological material architectures in the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) space. Existing biomaterial fabrication techniques (e.g. 3D printing, electrospinning, and templating) fall short in building the complex combinations of chemical and structural elements, with limited feature resolution. Our recent development in low-voltage electrospinning patterning (LEP), and its combination with additive manufacturing, opens up new avenues in the creation of geometrically defined biomaterial matrices. This presentation will demonstrate LEP’s applications in fabricating bio-scaffolds, single-fibres with multi-scale morphologies, and the printing of microelectrodes onto flexible substrates.

About Yan Yan Shery Huang
Shery Huang is a University Lecturer in Bioengineering from the Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge. Her research group ‘Biointerface’, is driven by translational bioengineering research, focusing on 3D bioprinting/ biomicrofabrication, and developing biomimetic organ-on-chips for biological studies and drug testing.

About University of Cambridge
Engineering at Cambridge is an integrated department comprised of the best academics, staff and students from around the world. Not only do we top the academic rankings, but we deliver practical outcomes for society. I feel a great sense of both excitement and responsibility in leading this institution given the influence it has on pivotal issues such as energy, cities, transport, healthcare and manufacturing. My aim is to do everything I can to allow everyone here to perform at their best, engage with real issues and make a difference.

It would be easy to get complacent given this success, but I see a tremendous opportunity to take the Department to a new level. Engineering in most universities is split into separate departments; but we are one department. This structural advantage means we can tackle the really big challenges facing society. But this strength is tempered by our old and scattered building stock. Uniting on one site with new purpose-built facilities and the right support will unlock the full potential of our brilliant people. This is the change I wish to bring.