Reactive Inkjet Printed 3D silk microrockets for micro-stirring, cargo transport and drug delivery applications – Presented by David Alexander Gregory, University of Sheffield

Reactive Inkjet Printed 3D silk microrockets for micro-stirring, cargo transport and drug delivery applications – Presented by David Alexander Gregory, University of Sheffield at The 3D Medicine & Pharmaceutical Printing Conference which will take place on  Feb 01, 2017 at MECC Maastricht in The Netherlands.

We present the first Reactive Inkjet Printed (RIJ) silk-based enzyme-powered microrockets that swim via bubble-propulsion and are viable in a vast range of aqueous solutions such as human serum or PBS solutions. These micromotors have high potential for future drug delivery applications as well as for cargo transport and micro stirring challenges. We demonstrate the ability to alter their trajectory behavior (motion) by altering their structure via predefined digital patterns during the printing process. They have high potential to be tuned for different applications by adding different moieties into the silk scaffold structures for example for Lab-on-Chip diagnostic devices.

About David Alexander Gregory
David Alexander Gregory currently works as a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at The University of Sheffield. He obtained his PhD in 2016 at Sheffield University after an MSc in Bio-nanotechnology (Sheffield and Leeds University).  He also holds a BSc in Physics (Lancaster University) and a BSc in Biochemistry (Keele University).

About University of Sheffield
We’re a member of the Russell Group of leading UK research universities. Our outstanding performance for excellent teaching and research, as part of a genuinely global community, is consistently confirmed by international independent assessments. The University is rated 84th in world in the 2016 QS World University Rankings.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.