Researchers Find Iron-Manganese Alloy Material Viable for 3D Printing Scaffolding to Regenerate Tissue

One hears the terms 3D printing and scaffolding thrown together often in the long list of ‘what new technology can do for us lately.’ But what is it really, and what are its implications?

Scaffolding itself is a vehicle used to regenerate, or re-grow, biological materials such as bone and tissue. The uses of artificial scaffolding in the engineering of tissue are being heavily researched and used in some cases, but with 3D printing, scientists are racing to the finish line—and beginning a new journey altogether for many disciplines, to include medicine, science, technology, and engineering.

Dr. Kumta
Now, Dr. Prashant Kumta, at the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering, is using 3D printing to produce microscopic scaffolds of iron and manganese alloys to foster new bone and tissue growth. Iron is considered a good option for this as it presents great durability–though it does not offer enough corrosiveness. Using an iron-manganese combination, Dr. Kumta has discovered a 3D printed material that corrodes more effectively and rapidly. It has also been verified as a viable solution due to a 3D printed goat mandible researchers were able to produce working from a CT scan. … (read more)

Source: 3Dprint.com